Timber Sash Windows and Other Types of Windows For Your Home

It goes without saying that timber sash windows are among the most popular styles for UK homes. Here’s some information about these and other styles of windows available to UK homeowners.

Double hung windows: Very common in the UK and USA, this type of timber sash window consists of 2 sashes (glass panes in wooden frames) that slide up and down and past each other in a vertical track in the window frame. Sliding sash windows may also have a rope-pulley-and-counterweight system (older models) or a spring balance (newer models) that assists in operating the window. A window is said to be double hung if both panes are capable of sliding in the frame.

Double hung tilt windows: A significant improvement over standard double hung windows, at least as far as cleaning is concerned. In this type of window, one sash can be removed via a tilt mechanism for cleaning from the inside, eliminating the need to clean the window from the outside.

Sliding windows: This is another type of timber sash window, although it can also be made from PVC or aluminum. These windows slide in horizontal tracks. Like double hung windows, either 1 or both sashes may be capable of sliding. Sometimes a roller mechanism facilitates sliding and the tracks are perforated so that rainwater does not accumulate in them. Sliding sash windows are usually tall and somewhat narrow. This gives them an elegant look.

Casement windows: A type of window that opens like a door. Hinged on one side, this type of window can be opened as much as 100% using crank-and-gear mechanism. Casement windows are more weatherproof than other types of sash windows. Outward opening casement windows usually have screens that mount from inside the house while inward opening casements have screens that mount from the outside.

Bay and bow windows: As the name suggests, these windows project outward from the house’s exterior wall. These elaborate wood sash windows can have 3 or more panes that allow a view to the side as well as to the front. In most cases, the side windows open while the larger center window remains fixed.

Awning windows: These wooden sash windows are hinged along the top sash and tilts out to open via a crank mechanism. Screens fit the window from the inside. They can be left open in wet weather with no worry of rain getting in. A variant known as a hopper window is hinged on the lower sash and tilts in to open.

Jalousie windows: Resembling a venetian blind, these windows consist of a series of narrow panes that open and close as a group when the crank is operated.

The windows are an important part of any UK home. Although timber sash windows are most common, there are a variety of others from which to choose when shopping for replacements.

Morris Streak has been installing timber and sash windows for the last 20 years. He is focused exclusively on the sash windows and timber window market. Since that time, he has shown hundreds of homeowners how to properly install sash and timber windows in their homes. By eliminating salesmen and installers, the owner of a typical 3 bedroom, 2 bath home can save thousands of dollars in costs, while at the same time ensuring that each window is done correctly.

Morris is also a dedicated member of Premier Windows Ltd – The goal is to provide the highest quality windows and workmanship in order to truly enhance the aesthetic of your home. To achieve this, we install only the best, most secure and energy efficient windows and doors. Premier Windows Ltd. specialises in sash and timber windows and to be more specific, Premier deals best in double glazed sash windows, sash window repair, sliding sash windows, sash windows, timber sash windows wood sash windows, timber frame windows, timber replacement windows,timber windows and doors, timber windows uk.

If you need more information feel free to get in touch with us at http://www.premierwindows.ltd.uk/sash-windows

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